Hilary Duff is sorry for pilgrim and Native American Halloween costumes

Hilary Duff has apologised after she and boyfriend Jason Walsh attended a celebrity Halloween bash dressed as a Native American and a scantily-clad pilgrim.
Nanjing Night Net

The former Disney star was met with a wave of outrage after pictures of the pair in the poor-taste costumes at the Casamigos Tequila Halloween party appeared over the weekend.

Walsh, who met Duff while working as her personal trainer, wore a headdress and face paint, while Duff wore a pilgrim’s hat and top.

It was the couple’s first red carpet appearance together, after they confirmed their relationship last month.

Needless to say, Twitter was quick to call out the pair for shameless cultural appropriation and insensitivity via the worst medium possible: the couple costume. No @HilaryDuff Traditional dress is not a costume and you being dressed as a pilgrim proves to me how insensitive and ignorant you are. https://t.co/0NvP6DD79I— LOOKING FOR CL’S EP (@hahannah14) October 29, [email protected]@[email protected] Surprised to see this was taken in 2016 bc 1) wow blatant racism and 2) Hillary Duff.— Sara Marie (@Ms_SaraMarie) October 29, [email protected] your halloween costume is ignorant and incredibly disappointing. Come on lizzy mcguire… Feel like Gordo would’ve stopped this— Emily (@ejlouws) October 30, 2016I’d bet my life that Hilary Duff ~meant~ no harm; she just exists in a bubble of white privilege, and ~that~ does harm

so we talk about it— @PiaGlenn (@PiaGlenn) October 30, 2016

Early on Monday morning, Duff posted an apology for the costume on her Twitter account.

“I am SO sorry to people I offended with my costume,” she wrote. “It was not properly thought through and I am truly, from the bottom of my [heart] sorry.”

In future, maybe a good litmus test for whether a costume should leave the house is just: is this directly referable to a genocide?

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Halloween 2016Mega Gallery

Halloween 2016 | Mega Gallery Halloween at Lithgow.
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Halloween at Lithgow.

Picture: Chantelle Hitchenor.

Sienna looking pretty evil for Lithgow Festival. Photo Eliza N John Pearce from Bathurst.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Richmond resident Lisa Cox’s children dressed up in Ghostbusters inspired costumes for Halloween.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Photo Laura Hannan from Orange.

Becka sent in this spooky photo from the Lithgow Halloween Festival.

Picture: Toni McInerney.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

My daughter’s first jack o lantern. First time carving a pumpkin. Photo Pamela Frape from Bathurst

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Picture: Kapooka Neighbourhood House

The Leader reader Tina Scott sent through this photo of her Halloween-inspired property.

Tina Scott sent in this photo of an interesting Halloween costume.

Oura’s Halloween celebration. Picture: Les Smith.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Shayden Wadley took this photo of their property on Acacia Drive, Narellan.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Picture: Kapooka Neighbourhood House

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Picture: Kapooka Neighbourhood House

Halloween at Lithgow.

Elly Kennedy took this photo of her property on McRae Avenue, Camden.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Photo Danielle Weddup from Bathurst

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Elly Kennedy took this photo of her property on McRae Avenue, Camden.

Photo Danielle Weddup from Bathurst.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Oura’s Halloween celebration. Picture: Les Smith.

Picture: Toni McInerney.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Becka sent in this spooky photo from the Lithgow Halloween Festival.

Oura’s Halloween celebration. Picture: Les Smith.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Picture: Kapooka Neighbourhood House

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Shayden Wadley took this photo of their property on Acacia Drive, Narellan.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Picture: Kapooka Neighbourhood House

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Becka sent in this spooky photo from the Lithgow Halloween Festival.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Photo Tracey Harvey from Orange.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Amy-Louise Gaffey sent in this haunting photo of her property in Riverstone.

Oura’s Halloween celebration. Picture: Les Smith.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Oura’s Halloween celebration. Picture: Les Smith.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Photo Trudy Young from Bathurst.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Oura’s Halloween celebration. Picture: Les Smith.

Tony Sheedy sent through this spooky photo of a property on Colliers Avenue at Beverly Hills.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Photo Tracey Harvey from Orange.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Tony Sheedy sent through this spooky photo of a property on Colliers Avenue at Beverly Hills.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Oura’s Halloween celebration. Picture: Les Smith.

Halloween at Lithgow.

Becka sent in this spooky photo from the Lithgow Halloween Festival.

Hawkesbury Gazette reporter Conor Hickey had an up close experience with a witch on Monday.

Picture: Toni McInerney.

Picture: Toni McInerney.

Picture: Toni McInerney.

Oura’s Halloween celebration. Picture: Les Smith.

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Video: Melbourne Cup jockey Blake Spriggs and his love of luxury cars

Blake Spriggs with a $600,000 Ferrari he loaned for a day in 2012.ON and off the race track, Blake Spriggs likes to travel in style.
Nanjing Night Net

So when he called into the luxury car dealership of close friend and former employer Terry Mullens in Sydney recently, he didn’t miss the chance to take a 2013 Ferrari California for a spin.

In tomorrow’s @newcastleherald, @BlakeSpriggs and his need for speed ahead of #MelbourneCup ride pic.twitter南京夜网/GNKN53XRC7

— Craig Kerry (@craigkerry77) October 31, 2016

“They had me in there and tried to convince me to buy a Ferrari,” Spriggs said.“I said‘if I win the cup, I might come back’, he laughed.

“They had a second-hand one there and it was beautiful, but I said ‘I’ve got to go before I do something stupid’.”

Spriggsjoked that he had already done the numbers and the jockey’s five per cent commission from the Melbourne Cup first prize of $3.6 million –$180,000 – was“about the cost of the car”.

The Ferrari California Blake Spriggs test drove recently.

The Newcastle-raised hoop, who recently traded in an Audi R8 for an Audi S6, said: “I’ve always had nice cars because I enjoy them. I don’t live a party lifestyle, so that’s my reward.”

Spriggs, who will ride Sir John Hawkwood in the Melbourne Cup on Tuesday,worked as a salesman forMullens during a tough time in his career four years ago when he broke his ankle and was out for five months.

“Iwas doing it tough when it came to race rides because I’d been out of my time as an apprentice for a couple of months and it wasn’t going to plan,” he said. “Then once I was injured, it made me wonder if it was going to be worth going into it again, if I could find something else that I enjoyed instead.I did enjoy it but it doesn’t overtake racing for me.”

“Istill enjoy being around the nice cars, but it’s not at the same level as racing when you can get to this sort of level.”

Spriggs said Mullens, who owns Sydney City Prestige,Artarmon, continued to be a great supporter and he regularly visited his dealership to catch up.

“Terry’s been a long-time family friend of mine and I met him through riding his horses,” he said.

“He’s always been there for me since I met him. He’s a very helpful person andout there to help people.

“He doesn’t expect anything in return, he’s that sort of person. He treats me like family and he actually calls me his son.

“He was there at probably one of the harder times and he’s there now.”

Bus driver Manmeet Sharma’s family calls for justice, safety for community

Manmeet Sharma, left, with his elder brother Amit. Photo: Alisher Amit / FacebookAs Manmeet Sharma’s state of Punjab, India celebrates Diwali, the festival of light, his brother and close family friend are calling for justice.
Nanjing Night Net

Long time family friend Winnerjit Goldy and Manmeet’s older brother Amit Sharma, also known as Amit Alisher, flew into Brisbane early Sunday morning and as they sat in a home in Brisbane’s south east later today with the curtains drawn, they were physically and emotionally exhausted.

They had just been to visit the spot where their brother and friend had been burned to death as he sat behind the wheel of a bus at Moorooka on Friday.

Winnerjit Goldy at the site where Manmeet Sharma was killed. Photo: 7 News Queensland

Mr Goldy said neither he nor Amit had slept since learning of Manmeet’s death, which had rocked them to their core.

Speaking on behalf of Amit, who was too shocked to talk as he grievedfor his brother, Mr Goldy said the last few days had been extremely difficult.

“From last three days, all the time has been very hard for us, every time is very hard for us, it is really the worst time in our lives we are suffering from something the whole world knows about,” he said.

Mr Goldy said their 29-year-old brother and friend was a “visionary man” who was a leader in his community.

“He was not only driver, he is a shining star, a good artist, a good hero, he had made two movies, he was a good social worker, he did a lot of things for his community in Australia even in India also,” he said.

“We invested everything on that guy, for his studies for his life.”

Manmeet’s family back home in the village of Alisher have not been told of the “heinous” crime, Mr Goldy said, and neither he nor Amit have seen their parents since learning of Manmeet’s death.

“Even we haven’t met our parents, we can’t face them, what do we say?” he said.

“We have closed everything, we have disconnected the televisions before we left.

“Right now we have just told them Manmeet is in a coma, he had a very big accident.”

Mr Goldy said their village has cancelledtheir Diwali celebrations, a five-day festival where rows or series of lights are lit to celebrate the triumph of good over bad, as the village mourns in silence.

“The family has gone to the temple to pray in general because of the festival – everyone in the town is watching them but noone is speaking a word,” he said.

“Everyone knows in the village except for them.”

Mr Goldy said Manmeet, who was a school bus driver before he wasa taxi and bus driver, had gained his Australian citizenship just six months prior to his death and had always spoken of justice in Australia.

“Whenever we talk about Australia, he always said it is a country of justice, so we need the government to fulfilhis words and hopefully in the future they will do their best,” he said.

“We need from the community support, we need the support from the government also and we need a peaceful country so the community of Indians who are staying over here, their security should be good.

“A country like this one, we never expected these things, it can’t be happening, but it has.”

Amit to take his brother’s body back to Indianvillage

The two men will remain in Australia until Manmeet’s body is released to them.

“As soon as the formalities are completed we will take the body back home to India to have the funeral over there,” Mr Goldy said.

The pair are expected to meet with Lord Mayor Graham Quirk on Monday to discuss a memorial for Manmeet.

“We demanded a memorial, we are seeing the Lord Mayor tomorrow, we need a memorial at the bus stop, to put his name over there, or at the park,” Mr Goldy said.

“Everyone has supported us, so in future also, whatever the direction the case goes, we need the justice from the government.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

The freak snake with the scorpion sting that could take your pain away

Dr Bryan Fry holds a king cobra. Young king cobras are often prey to the blue coral snake. Photo: Bryan FryThis snake is a freak. It boasts the largest venom glands in the world. It eats king cobras for breakfast. And it has a scorpion’s sting. But that’s not what has scientists excited.
Nanjing Night Net

“We have found the wildest snake toxin ever, from the venom of the most outrageous snakes,” Bryan Fry said. “It does something no other snake has ever done.”

The Queensland University venomologist is talking about the aptly named long-glanded blue coral snake of south-east Asia – and its unusual venom which takes hold with lightning efficiency.

The super-powerful venom of the long-glanded blue coral snake could inspire new pain treatments for humans. Photo: Tom Charlton

A reptile with electric blue stripes and neon-red head and tail, it grows up to two metres long. Its venom glands extend to a good 60 centimetres – about one-quarter of its body length.

“On the scale of weird, this one goes to 11,” Dr Fry said. “It’s a freaky snake.”

Described as “the killer of killers” due to its taste for young king cobras, this snake is unique among snakes because, like scorpions, its venom causes its prey to spasm.

Exactly how it does this has been discovered for the first time. The results, published in the journalToxins, could lead to improved pain management for humans.

“This venom hits a particular type of sodium channel that is important for the treatment of pain in humans,” Dr Fry said.

With colleagues from Australia, China, Singapore and the US, Dr Fry identified six unusual peptides in the venom of the blue coral snake that can switch on all of its prey’s nerves at once. This immediately immobilises its victim.

So what does a paralysis-inducing venom have to do with improving the treatment and management of pain in humans?

Dr Fry said the research showed that the venom used receptors which were critical to pain in humans. Learning about how these worked could enable improved pain treatment and management.

The venom glands of the long-glanded blue coral snake are up to 60 centimetres long. Photo: Bryan Fry

“It’s also the first vertebrate to do this via sodium channels,” Dr Fry said. “So from a drug development perspective, this is interesting as this animal is evolutionarily-speaking closer to us than a scorpion. Which means it might be more amenable to us.”

While the length of the long-glanded blue coral snake’s venom glands was known, the way the venom worked hadn’t been studied. And given there are related species, there could be as many as 200 variations of the peptides in total.

“It’s a great example of why studying the really weird animals is a great path for biodiscovery and you can’t get any weirder than this snake with the longest venom glands in the world,” Dr Fry said.

“You can’t predict where the next wonder drug came from so you need to protect what you have.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.