Hat-trick aids in win

FRESH off a bye and washouts, the Leeton Soldiers Club Colts claimed their first victory of the Leeton District Cricket Association’s season on Saturday.
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EARNING EARLY HAT TRICK: Colts’ bowler Josh Carn was instrumental in holding the L&D batsmen down in their win on Saturday (pictured from a 2015-16 season match). Photo: Ron Arel

Led by bowler Josh Carn, who secured a hat-trick in his first club game for the year, the Colts accounted for the L&D CC Ferrets in what was a close match.

The Colts got over the line with an 18-run victory, leaving the Ferrets winless so far this season.

The Colts batted first and Glenn Vitnell (10) and Dylan Barnes (23) began to do some damage.

Vitnell was the first to fall, out LBW off a ball delivered by L&D’s Ben Elwin (2-15), replaced by Mackenzie Saddler (3).

Saddler fell from a ball delivered by Steve Campbell (3-21) caught by Mitch Hardie.

Nathan Carn (23) replaced Saddler and proceeded to chip away at the Ferrets.

Barnes was the next to go, falling LBW to a delivery from Steve Campbell.

Colts captain Jarryd Day (24) moved in after Barnes’ departure and continued to apply the pressure.

Carn fell LBW on a ball from Adrian Axtill (2-19) and would be replaced by Billy Dickinson (0) who was Axtill’s next victim out LBW.

He was followed shortly by Sam Cooper (0) who was bowled out by Campbell.

Todd Pattison (5) came in and covered Cooper’s loss, but hetoo fell without much of a contribution caught off the bowling of Campbell.

Alex Crelley (14*) came in after Pattison’s departure and continued to keep the runs flowing.

When Day finally fell from a delivery by Elwin, Callum Bell (1) came in to finish off the charge for the Colts at 131 runs.

First in for the Ferrets were Chris Cox (2) and Ben Elwin (0), but Cox would be the first to fall to Carn (4-21) and was replaced by Mitch Hardie (18), but before the dust had settled, Elwin was sent off the field.

The delivery by Carn was caught by Vitnell and set the stage for a stellar performance by Carn.

In for Elwin was Anthony Tocin (0), but Tocin wouldn’t get the chance to help his side, sent packing LBW by Carn.

Adrian Axtill (43*) pushed, but it was not enough as the Ferrets fell short by 18 runs on the day.

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A family’s racing legacy

Three generations of the McAlpine family. Colin McAlpine, centre, is flanked by his son Scott and grandson Harry at Eureka Stud in September 2015. Photo by VIRGINA HARVEYICONIC Australian stud ownerColin McAlpine will be remembered as one of Queensland’s industry leaders who spent his life among Thoroughbreds on the family’s Eureka Stud, near Cambooya, following his passing at age 84 last month.
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When he was born, Colin’s father Andrew McAlpine was one of the most respected stud managers in Queensland, as a long-time servant for the Edward Ramsey family at their Banchory Stud, close to what was to become Eureka Stud.

The new property of Eureka Stud was established in the early 1940s by Andrew McAlpine, where he stood foundation sires including locals Phantom,by Peter Pan’s sire Pantheon, and St Constant, awinner of the VRC Cantala Stakes, by the imported Son-In-Law sire Constant Son.

In the 1950s, the stud traded under the ownership of A.S.McAlpine and Sons, and stood stallions including imports Urgay,by French Guineas winner Fiterari,and Gaekwar’s Pride,a good miler in England.

One of Urgay’s progeny, Urgona, won the Queensland Oaks and Queensland Cup, while Gaekwar’s Pride sired classic winner Martello Towers, a grey superstar who won the Canterbury and Rosehill Guineas, the AJC Derby and Hobartville Stakes in the spring in Sydney in 1959.

As a young man, Colin McAlpine took the reins of Eureka and quickly uplifted it to one of Queensland’s leading studs.

Sires standing in the 1960s included Young Brolga,a Wilkes’ AJC Sires Produce Stakes and Breeders Plate winner, and Messmate,a high-class English performer by Derby winner Blue Peter.

Colin McAlpine chose more than a dozen sires for Eureka last century.

These wereheaded by Semipalatinsk, a good Italian juvenile and US-bred son of champion US handicap horse Nodouble, a sire by Todman’s exported champion brother Noholme.

Passing in 2006, Semipalatinsk was used for 21 seasons at Eureka, which resulted in more than 800 foals whowon more than 1800 races. These included stakes winners Just Now, Memphis Blues, Eureka Jewel, Palatious, Alma Mater, and Dancing Cossack.

Bletchingly grandson Brave Warrior was another outstanding sire to stand at Eureka Stud.Tragically dying after only two seasons at stud, Brave Warrior still sired 87 winners from 110 foalsincluding wonderful racehorses Show A Heart, whowon four group 1 racesand was a prolific Queensland sire, andAnother Warrior.

This century the stud has continued to flourish via Colin and now his son Scott McAlpine and family.

Two celebrated horses they bredand part-owned are half-brothers Spirit Of Boom, whowon $2.4 million,and Temple Of Boom, who wasby Eureka shuttle sire Piccolo, and won $1.9 million.

By the Lyndhurst Stud Queensland Sequalo, Spirit Of Boom is standing his third stud season at Eureka, after serving 301 mares in his first two seasons.

Spirit Of Boom stands at Eureka alongside Red Ransom stallion Red Dazzler.

A multiple group 2 Melbourne winner, Red Dazzler has been a prolific sire of winners and includes Queensland Oaks-G1 winner Tinto, and ATC Villiers Stakes-G2 winner Rudy.

Relief package availableA RELIEF package of up to $500,000 for trainers and owners in the Southern Districts (the SDRA) and the Central West (the CDWRA) regions has been announced by Racing NSW following the prolonged stretch of wet weather and storm damage which occurred from September.

“The funding relief is a response to the uncharacteristically high rate of abandoned race meetings in the Southern and Western regions,” Racing NSWchief executivePeter V’landys said.

It was estimated that approximately 400 individual horses trained in either the SDRA or CDWRA regions missed having a start at one of the 13 cancelled meetings from September to the middle of last month.Horses also missed significant trackwork due to damage or closed tracks and training facilities hindering their preparation to race.

Racing NSW also announcedfunding available on application for any significant storm damage caused to a trainer’s property or supplies by the severe rain, wind and flooding.

Mosayter success at ArgyleMOSAYTER is best known as the sire of Mr Moet, but more winners are emerging from the stallion, who stands atLouise Ellis’ Argyle Thoroughbreds, Panuara, near Orange.

Mosaytion,a four-year-old Mosayter gelding, has won two races this season. Other winners include four-year-olds Missy Rhythmos, and Plushenko.

Standing at $6600, Mosayter is by Northern Dancer’s grandson and internationally recognised Storm Cat, and was produced from Bashayer, a Mr Prospector half-sister to five major stakes horses including two group 1 winners.

These were produced from Height Of Fashion, a Bustino group 2 winning mare who is a three-quarter-sister to Burghclere, granddam of Deep Impact, Japan’s Horse Of The Year and champion sire.

Interestingly, Australia has introduced its first Deep Impact sire son,the Japanese-bred Real Impact who is standing at Arrowfield Stud, Scone, standing at a fee of $19,250.Real Impact won group 1 races in Japan and in Australia, as well as finishing second in the time-honoured Doncaster Handicap-G1 at Randwick.

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Getting active can be like climbing bridges

SCALING NEW HEIGHTS: Signing yourself up for adventures like climbing the Sydney Harbour Bridge can be a pleasant and motivating way to get some physical activity into your life. Picture: Brook MitchellAs they say in real estate, location, location, location.
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But the importance of location can be more than just about where you live.

As my legs started to burn climbing the Sydney Harbour Bridge with friends on Saturday, Ithought to myself, ‘You can’t get much better than this view for a workout’.

OK, soscaling one of Australia’s most iconic landmarks is probably not something you would do everyday. Unless of course you were rich or perhaps one of the guides, which I reckon would be a pretty good job.

But the point I wanted to make was that we walked and climbed for a couple of hours, and although I wouldn’t describe it as a taxing workout, we were still being active and I barely noticed it at all. Until of course I fell asleep with the kids that night from sheer physical exhaustion.

I hadn’t just climbed the bridge, we had also covered quite a lot of ground walking around Circular Quay and a frantic pram-pushing sprint with kids in tow to make a ferry or two. But there was so much to look at that even the kids barely complained of being tired.

Location, you see, can be a great motivating factor to fitness.

I always feel like a workout is much easier to do when there’s a good backdrop.

I have several places I like to do a fitness session, specifically for the view. It is generally near the beachbecause I find something calming about seeing water.

Sometimes motivation, or a lack thereof, can be a huge hurdle to fitness. So, if you have found yourself struggling to get motivated but also freaking out as Summer fast approaches, then maybe try getting active at one of the many scenic locations we boast in our fine city.

We are seriously spoiled for choice.

I also find a good location has a positive influence for my mental well-beingas well as taking my mind off what I am doing. This is especially useful if it is a particularly hard session.

Here are some of my favourite, most inspiring places to work out around town:

King Edward Park. Offers various places for both a good workout and a view. You can easily clock up a few kilometres here. There are some challenging sets of stairs to run or walk, various hills to charge up and a couple of flat locations for a simple strength workout. Shepherd’s Hill is one of those places and one of my favourite sessions is doing a circuit of squats, push-ups, lunges and pull-ups followed by a jog down then up the stairs that lead to the Bogey Hole. Ouch, but well worth the view once you get back to the top.

Glenrock State Conservation Area: I really got to appreciate both its beauty and complexity during a recent trail run there. Somany options for exercise including bushwalking/hiking, trail running andmountain biking,and it is mere minutes from many Newcastle suburbs.

Merewether Ocean Baths: Take your pick of activities here, all with stunning surrounds. Walk, run, ride, surf, swim or a sand workout.

Renee Valentine is a writer, qualified personal trainer and mother of three. [email protected]南京夜网419论坛

BREATHTAKING BACKDROP: We are spoiled for choice in Newcastle and the Hunter region for prime workout locations. Picture: Dean Osland

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Season open with plenty of highlights

The opening race meeting for the season at Solo Speedwayfinished with amazingracing.
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The highlight was the 30-lap Sprintcar final with close battles throughout the pack.

GerryHoekstra and Jason Redpath shared the frontwith Hoekstra getting the better startwith an aggressive move.

Speedway: Jason Redpath in action during the 30-lap Sprintcar final. Picture: Angryman Photography

Hoekstra maintained an early command which would shorten due to lapped traffic just under ten laps into therace.

In the closing laps the battle intensified with both cars coming together in turn two on severaloccasions.

Redpath looked for a way passedand eventually found it with sixlaps remaining by executing a brilliant passing move. Kurt Luttrellfinished third.

Formula 500’s were won by Rick Weatherall who had placed in each of his heats and was certainlyon the pace early. Gary Sutcliffe drove to a fine second place ahead of Dale Peck.

Jakobe Jetson had his first meeting for the season and picked up where he left off with victory ahead of Ellis Dickenson and Jayden Triffet.

The Bombers are always a hard hitting affair and their first event of the year saw some driversholding a grudge over the off season.

Only a handful of cars survived the night to completethe final with Kylie Jetson in first ahead of Fred Eiszelle and DennisDavidson.

Drew Manser was successful in Tassie Sixes taking first place from Todd Russell and DamienWickham.

Speedcars had timed runs throughout the night and whilst still a new category of racing with low carnumbers this category will grow substantially. Mitchell Freeman was on pace all night winning thefinal ahead of Trent Blake and Kerry Short.

The season continues next weekend at Gulf Western Speedway.

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A tough barrier for Cup attempt

FORMER Bathurst apprentice jockey Hugh Bowman has been enjoying a Melbourne Spring Carnival to remember on super mare Winx but on Tuesday he will have a tougher time trying to take Who Shot Thebarman to success in Australia’s biggest race.
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A Melbourne Cup victory still eludes Bowman and if that’s to change after this year’s edition 3,200-metre feature then he will have to overcome some highly-touted names and a horror barrier draw on the Chris Waller stayer.

Hugh Bowman

Who Shot Thebarman is no stranger to the Melbourne Cup, with today marking his third start, and picked up third place in the event in 2014 when ridden by Glen Boss.

However, the eight-year-old gelding hasn’t quite found the form since which carried him to that placing.

When coupled with the start from barrier 20 it’s going to take an extraordinary performance from both Bowman and Who Shot Thebarman to pull off the win.

The gelding is still searching for his first win in almost a year and was listed at $40 when betting markets opened.

Who Shot Thebarman will carry56kg –the same asfavourite Hartnell, who he hasn’t got close to this season.

On the brighter side, the latest race for Who Shot Thebarman at least suggests he’s coming into the race ready to give his best after finishing a half-length behind stablemate Grand Marshall in the Moonee Valley Cup (2,500m).

The other factor in Who Shot Thebarman’s favour compared to several other Melbourne Cupcontenders will be that the two-mile distance will be of little to no concern.

He’s run six times at 3,200m or more, which includes a win and two placings.

Bowman himself comes into Tuesday feature on the back of two Group 1 successes on Saturday.

He claimed a win withLe Romain in the Cantala Stakes and also on Flying Artie in the Coolmore Stud Stakes.

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Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix 2016photos, video

Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix 2016 | photos, video RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
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RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Beatle Bailey and Kade Dorrington’s fan club at the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock, October 30, 2016. Picture: Krystal Sellars

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Action from the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock NSW. Winner Michael Kirkness, co-rider with Chris Watson, reacting as he crosses the finish line. Picture: Max mason-Hubers

RACE: Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock NSW. Winning co-riders Chris Watson and Michael Kirkness posing for a picture after the race. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

RACE: Great day at the Postie Bike Grand Prix. Congrats again to the organisers and sponsors for another fantastic event for the town. Picture: Dale Taylor

RACE: Picture by Vickie Green

RACE: 1st timer today, great turn out. Picture: Rebecca Watson

RACE: 1st timer today, great turn out. Picture: Rebecca Watson

RACE: Its was a good day front seat well done number 10. Picture: Kristy Bice

RACE: Picture by David Soper

RACE: Picture by David Soper

RACE: Picture by Peter McGregor

Grid girls and commentator Zak Caban. Picture: Rachel Cade (via Facebook)

Picture: Rachel Cade (via Facebook)

Picture: Rachelle Corcoran

Picture: Rachelle Corcoran

Picture: Rachelle Corcoran

Winner Michael Kirkness is interviewed by commentator Zak Caban after the race. Picture: Rachelle Corcoran

Picture: Rachelle Corcoran

Commentator Zak Caban interviews winner Chris Watson after the race. Picture: Rachelle Corcoran

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‘Generational change’

Dissatisfaction with the former council’s decision making and direction, and apparent disregard for community consultation, partnered with a clear desire for change and a strong voter turnout of about 78 per cent, are likely to have contributed to six new councillors being elected in the Macedon Ranges.The Macedon Ranges community has spoken.
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Dissatisfaction with the former council’s decision making and direction, and apparent disregard for community consultation, partnered with a clear desire for change and a strong voter turnout of about 78 per cent, are likely to have contributed to six new councillors being elected in the 2016 election.

In order of election, first across the line for East Ward was Lancefield’s Bill West, followed by Kyneton’s Henry Bleeck (former councillor 2005-08) and Newham’s Natasha Gayfer.

In South Ward, Macedon’s Mandi Mees was a clear front runner securing 23.82 per cent of the primary vote (the closest to achieving an outright quota), followed by Bullengarook’s Andrew Twaits and Gisborne’s Helen Radnedge.

For West Ward, returning councillor, Woodend’s Jennifer Anderson, was well out in front with 21.73 per cent of the primary vote, followed by Woodend’s Janet Pearce and returned councillor, Gisborne’s Roger Jukes.

With no one candidate securing an outright quota, all results came down to the distribution of preferences.

This led to Janet Pearce securing second place in West Ward, relegating Roger Jukes to third and ousting Newham’s Luke Spielvogel who had earlier secured third place after primary votes were counted.

Helen Radnedge ousted former councillor Russell Mowatt in South Ward and Henry Bleeck leapfrogged Natasha Gayfer for second place in East Ward (although both were still elected).

The result was welcomed by Macedon Ranges Residents Association secretary Christine Pruneau.

“Generational and philosophical change – what a breath of fresh air!” Ms Pruneau said.

“While the community understands there’s a whole lot to do and it can’t all be done in one day, some quick action to signal that this council isn’t the last council would reinforce the hope and delight already engendered by the election results.”

It is anticipated that former mayor Jennifer Anderson will be re-elected as mayor.

MOUNT ALEXANDER

In Mount Alexander Shire, provisional results had one new councillor elected. Two wards were uncontested.

In Calder Ward, Tony Cordy was returned unopposed.

In Castlemaine Ward, Bronwen Machin and Tony Bell were returned, with Chris Cole ousted by Robin Taylor who has three previous terms on council under his belt.

In Coliban Ward Christine Henderson was returned, in Loddon River Ward John Nieman was newly elected unopposed with Michael Redden retiring, and in Tarrengower Ward Sharon Telford was returned.

The result for Mount Alexander won’t be officially declared until Wednesday morning at 10am.

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Saturday Cricket in the ManningPhotos

Saturday Cricket in the Manning | Photos Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s
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Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Great Lakes Green v Wingham U14’s

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Graeme Stinson

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Wingham v United 1st Grade

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

Old Bar v Taree West (1st Grade)

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Sat pennants

From back page.Both teams then added two shots,Fowler went on to add a further two shots.
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Pevic added two singles and they went to the break at 16-6.

Fowler added a single and two shots then Pevic replied with two.

Fowler hit back with four shots and then each team added a single. The final three ends went to Fowler enabling him to draw the game on 19 shots.

Gary Daniel, Brian Smith, Bertie Trewren and Greg Thomas picked up three shots on the first end then Terry McDonnell, Ian Windebank, Chris Mundie and Martyn March answered with two shots. Daniel won the next four ends to advance to 10-2. McDonnell came back with 2, 1 and 1 but Daniel returned fire with three shots and a single to go to the break leading 14-6.

McDonnell fired up and added 3 and 2 to close the gap, 11-14. Daniel gained a single and McDonnell then picked up two shots and followed up with a four to take the lead, 17-15. Daniel hit back with four shots and McDonnell tied the score with two singles. Daniel added a single on the final end to take the game 21-20.

Noel Kneebone, Alan Arbon, Karen Kneebone and Denis Fiegert picked up a single on the first end and Graham Wakefield, Peter Wegener, Tom Towns and Lynton Jones returned the favour on the next end. Kneebone won the next three ends adding four shots and Wakefield replied with two singles. Each team then added two shots and they went to the break at 10-5.

Kneebone continued to dominate and after 16 ends he led twenty two to five. Wakefield added two shots and Kneebone won the remaining ends to win the game 28-7.

Jervois v Murray Bridge Blue

Jervois remain the only undefeated team in Div 1 with a crushing 32 shot win over Murray Bridge Blue at Jervois, winning 2 rinks by an emphatic 17 shots apiece, and dropping the 3rd rinkby 2 shots. Andrew Stasinowsky led the way for the home side with a superb display, well supported by David Kempe, Derek Vanderzon and David Graham as they easily overwhelmed Hugh Smyth, Jim Freak, Peter White and David Ratsch. After picking up the first 2 ends to lead by 3 shots, Smyth was helpless as Stasinowski piled on a trio of 3’s, followed by a 4 and a single to lead 14 to 3 after 7 ends. After that he was able to limit the damage to 1’s and 2’s, and was evenable to score a 3 on the 17th to buck the trend, but the margin still steadily climbed for a 28 to 11 shot win for the home side.

Graeme Herbert, Rodger Zarantonello, Denis Hicks and Shawn Hicks made easy work of Brian Traeger, Bruce Attrill, Lynton Keen and Ben Traeger, and their 33 to 16 win could have been much bigger had it not been for a mid game slump.A tactical error on the 5th end saw Herbert take full toll and score the maximum 8 to propel his side to a 15 to 1 lead. The skippers hadcrossed withBlue holding 2 shots, but they had failed to cover the back and when Herbert somehow managed to cannon the jack back without taking the shot bowl with it a remarkable 10 shot turnaround resulted. Traeger was unable to cut back with his final bowl to deny the rare feat. But rather than drop their heads, Blue was able to fight back over the next 9 ends to reduce the margin to a respectable 6 shots, and were back in the game. Herbert again took control, winning 6 of the remaining 7 ends to add another 15 shots, while dropping a 4 on the 19th as their only blemish.

Paul Smart, John Jackson, Helen Lindner and Ron Goodwin were able to salvage something for the visitors on an otherwise miserable day for them, with a hard earnt 2 shot win over Blake Fiebig, Garry Mason, Graham Schenke and Martin Beaumont, 16 to 14 in a low scoring encounter. This game was closely contested throughout, with Smart holding sway for most of the day, but never extending his lead beyond 6 shots which he hadachieved by the 17th end. 1, 3 and 1 to Fiebig reduced the margin to a solitary shot on the last end, but he was unable to convert on the final end, conceding a single for a 2 shot loss.

Division 2Another good result for Jervois Red, this time against Karoonda has kept the colour in top position just ahead of Mannum, Tailem Bend Blue and Bridge Green with Karoonda not far away. There were not too many real surprises here, Tailem Blue just made it against Jervois Black, Mannum had 5 to spare over Bridge White while Bridge Green got full points in the encounter with Tailem Gold.

Green’s Graham Rolton and Rob. Hales went neck and neck for the first half but it was all Rolton’s team in the run home winning 6 of the last 7 ends to win by 11. Peter Shilton and Ian Shepherd also had a tight tussle but Shilton just did enough at the finish to get Greens home by shots.

Barry Kirchner’s rink always had the upper hand against Allen Hewett’s winning of the 21 ends played to be in front at the finish.

Tailem Bend Blue v Jervois Black

Tailem Bend Blue defeated Jervois Black 56 – 53

Tailem Bend Blue played host to Jervois Black. Blue managed to hold on to win the day by three shots with wins posted on two rinks.

Blue’s Scott Dinham was on the back foot at the start of his game with Black’s Don King, with King’s team leading 8 – 2 after six ends.

Six shots to Dinham’s team over the next two ends levelled the scores which was then followed with both teams trading shots over the next four ends before Dinham scored a three on the 13th end to go in at the break with a two shot lead, 13 – 11.

Dinham’s team managed to maintain it’s lead, scoring five shots to King’s four over the remaining eight ends to win the game by three shots, 18 – 15.

John Gregory faced an uphill battle in his game against Kevin Spinks. Spinks’ team picked up five shots on the first end and by the break was leading comfortably by 14 shots, 16 – 2.

Gregory’s team scored four singles after the break to get within ten shots but Spinks and his team maintained the upper hand and scored six shots to Gregory’s three over the final six ends to seal the win by 13 shots, 22 – 9.

Michael Thorne started well in his game with Owen Allen to be leading 9 – 2 after five ends.

Allen and his team fought back over the next five ends to be 10 – all. A single to Thorne before the break gave him back the lead.

A two to Allen’s team after the break got them in front for the first time in the game before Thorne and his team fought back, scoring 13 shots to two over the next six ends to be leading 24 – 14 after 18 ends.

The next end Allen picked up two shots followed by a single to Thorne, but it all came down to the last end to see which side was going to win.

Black held a one shot lead over Blue after the other two rinks had completed their games and were nervously waiting for the end result.

It was Thorne and his team who held on, scoring four shots to win their game by 13 shots, 29 – 16.

Karoonda v Jervois Red

Jervois Red scored a comfortable 25 shot win over Karoonda at Karoonda, with all rinks getting up. Len Gommers, John McEntee, Murray White and Des Kluske blitzed Ken Wegener,Richard Humphries, Robyn Burdett and Barry Cornish with a scintilating first 11 ends to lead 19 to 1.They then inexlicably dropped the next 4 ends, including a 5 on the 13th to see their lead cut back to 9 shots, before again recovering to win the final 6 ends and add another 10 shots to the finalmargin.

Red’s Rod Harris, Ted Roberts, John Petrovic and John McGowan made a similarly dominant start over opponents Barry Manuel, Robin Burdett, Val Herrmann and Reg Herrmann.They led 11 nil after 7 ends and looked to be in for an easy day. But the home side hit back, and after 16 ends they were in front by 2 shots 15 to 13.Harris had to find something, and he did so, winning the next 4 ends to lead by 3 with one remaining, and hung on for a 1shot win.

The final rink saw John Obst, Mike Liebich, Rob Tyas and Peter Phillips score a 20 to 15 win over Don Loller, Kevin Burdett, Morris Terrell and Warren Green.This match was much closer throughout, but Obst was generally in control and was able to hold the opposition at arms length to ensure maximum points for the visitors.

Division 3Bridge Purple earned full points again with Kaye Simes up by shots and Brian Densley 11, Jervois got the better of Mannum Gold by 16 shots with Bob Afford up by 19 for Jervois and Trevor Frahn by 3 shots for Mannum Gold. Bridge Green at Karoonda got in by 25 with Mike Obst finishing 6 in front and D. Macey by 19.

Bridge Red and Tailem Bend faced up at the Bridge with each winning a rink and Reds getting the favourable overall result by 7 shots.

Ruth Cross was a winner for Tailem Bend beating R. Traeger by 10 shots, it was a close encounter up to the 9th end where Traeger led by 2 shots. Tailem won the next 7 ends totalling up 13 shots to go to a lead of 11, Reds came back a little bit but Tailem had the answers with a 2 on the last to finish 10 in front.

Hedley Pullar notched up 2 points for Reds defeating Gary Beauglehall by 17 shots, after a tight struggle early the game was in the balance on the 13th end where Reds led by 3 shots. A 3 on the 14th started a run for Reds that Tailem couldn’t contain. The Bridge team went on to win 7 of the remaining 8 ends compiling 16 shots to only 2 in reply from Tailem Bend.

Mannum Green vRSL

Mannum Green were too strong for the RSL side and they won on both rinks to take maximum points in their 20 shot win.

Pam Bormann, Brenda Thomas, Chris Thomas and Deb Peach jumped away and led 16-0 after six ends. Rosie Jones, Richard Parsons, Jean Williamson and Anne Hughes then broke in with two singles. Bormann got going again and won five ends adding ten shots, 26-2. Jones broke the run with three shots.

Bormann picked up a single and two shots then Jones won the remaining five ends adding six shots to finish the day at 29-11.

Kerri Bolt, Barry Stoddart, Keith Hughes and Ida Warner gained two shots on the first end and then Marlene Davies, Colin Pym, Peter McAvaney and Ramon Leahy got going with five winning ends to move to 11-2. Successive twos for Bolt followed and Davies then added a single. Bolt picked up three shots and Davies added a single as they went to the break at 13-9.

Bolt came out firing and added five shots over three ends to take the lead 14-13. Davies tied the game with a single then Bolt added three more shots, 17-14. Singles for each team followed and Davies then won the final three ends to take the game 20-18.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Cheap solar and `water from air’ technology offer new gains for farms

Innovation advocate, Jon Dee, says rapidly falling solar panel and battery costs offer big energy saving and useage opportunities in regional areas. Drought-proofing big areas of rural Australia sector doesn’t have to involve building huge dams – we could draw water from the atmosphere says technology advocate, Jon Dee.
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The social entrepreneur and small business consultant says the technology to takemoisture from from the air and produce useful amounts of drinking water already exists and is being developed commercially on a small scale.

The challenge was to up-scale that process and identify where the technology could be best located in inland regions to support farm productivity in dry seasons and provide morale-lifting household water supplies.

He said the Israeli military used “water from air” converters in patrol vehicles operating in the desert for lengthy periods away from their re-supply bases.

Mr Dee, the founding force behind environmental charities Planet Ark and Do Something, told last week’s National Farmers Federation Congress farmers could also be making big savings from solar power and energy storage in the near future thanks to plummeting solar panel and battery costs.

Autonomous farm machinery and delivery vehicles were other technology advances now operating overseas and likely to deliver tangible productivity savings to agriculture here, within years.

“Australia’s (recent) chief scientist Professor Ian Chubb says Australia could double our food exports by 2050, but for farmers to achieve that we must deal with the soil and water availability constraints we face,” he said.

“From what I understand there are plenty of areas where adequate atmospheric moisture exists to make water from air, even in dry years.

“I feel there’s a great case in Australia for the government to promote investment and research into scaling up this technology and identifying where it can best be used economically.

“I’m not saying it’s definitely viable – it’s a fairly energy-hungry process at the moment – but it should be looked at.”

Energy efficiency was itself becoming a seriously attractive opportunityfor farmers and agricultural processors.

Solar farms in Spain now produced electricity from fields of photovoltaic panels for about 2.7 cents a kilowatt.

Solar panel costs in Australia had fallen 80 per cent in eight years, offering agriculture “huge opportunities for farmers to take control of their energy expenses with solar installations.”

Interestingly, the most effective solar panels for Australian conditions were even made in Adelaide, at lower production costs than the Chineseachieved.

Farmers installing solar (or more solar panels) and using weather analytical software to anticipate optimum sunlight periods and usage expectationswould likely cut energy bills by up to 70pc.

Port Augusta’s new Sundrop Farms in South Australia heated and cooled its 15,000 tonne a year hydroponic tomato crop’s glasshouse area, and desalinated a million litres of seawater, using 23,000 mirrors reflecting heat at a solar powered generator.

De Bortoli Wines, a big user of hot water in its Griffith (NSW) winery, had cut its water heating costs 90pc by installingmodern solar heating tube panels on itsroof areas.

Swedish furniture giant Ikea had solar panels on 90pc of its stores worldwide and paid no electricity bills in summer.

Ikea now sells its own solar panel range.

“Innovation like thiswill be the key to increasing the efficiency of growing the world’s food to feed apopulation rising byanother 2 billion people in the next 35 years,” Mr Dee said.

Battery technology improvements by Tesla (which also makes solar roof tiles and electriccars), LG and Panasonic, had halved energy storage costs in the past five years and prices continued to drop about 20pc annually.

“I strongly advise you to look at solar battery potential in your business, because if it’s not cost effective now it will be very soon,” said MrDee, who also hosts the Smart Moneyprogram on Sky television.

“Many farmersalready have solar panels on sheds and in their paddocks and they love talking about the savings they’ve made, but there are more money saving solutions emerging.”

His own business used stored power when energy prices were at their peak during the middle of the day.

Meanwhile, farm work was likely to get more efficient thanks tomachinery capable of operating un-manned overnight while the farmer slept.

Case IH’s automated tractor prototype now operating in the US could identifyand avoidtrees and other obstacles or overly-wet soil conditions, while ploughing around the clock.

It alsostopped workif too much rain set in.

“This sort of technology is already here in Australia and the possibilities were far more advanced than most people realise,” Mr Dee said.

“If you can afford to buy it, the Model S Tesla car will drive itself at 110 kilometres an hour on the M4 motorway in Sydney, and safely and smoothly change lanes.

“Tesla says all its new cars will now come with fully self-driving technology.”

Last week, Otto, a US self-driving truck maker, made the world’s first autonomous commercial delivery, driving 200km across Colorado to deliver 2000 cases of Budweiser beer.

Once on the road its driver shifted from the driver’s seat and to the sleeping compartment to prove he was not required – although he sat up, andawake for the trip.

Otto was bought for $US700 million by taxi service Uber early this year.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.